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“Around the Ben”: Position Rankings – Quarterback 2013

Over the next 10+ weeks, all positional rankings from quarterback (QB), to punter (P), to defensive tackle (DT) will be visited. The rankings will be based on past performances, upside, and surrounding talent, among other factors. These rankings are tailored for Major League Fantasy Sports, dynasty, but could be used, arguably, by any type league. The rankings start with quarterbacks because QBs are the engine that make most teams go, and dictate the amount of time a particular offense stays on the field per every possession. Granted, some QBs have morons for head coaches, but we won’t mention any names, although the names should be obvious for anyone who pays attention to football. Without further ado, let’s get to the rankings.

QB – Tier 1 Créme de la créme

1.) Aaron Rodgers – Should be the top QB off the boards in any league. All the guy has done since taking over Brett Favre’s job is dominate. His down year (2012: 39 TD, 8 INT) would be another QBs ceiling. Not only does he have phenomenal arm strength, he is also one of the smartest QBs in the game today. He makes smart decisions, and can scramble if nothing is there. If the past 2 seasons are any indicator of what he’ll produce, sign him up for 4,700 pass yards, 43 pass TDs, and 2-3 rush TDs; all while limiting interceptions (INTs). He gains 2 of the best RBs from the NFL draft in Eddie Lacy and Johnathan Franklin, with the latter also being a serviceable receiver out of the backfield. While losing Greg Jennings to the Vikings will hurt some, the RB additions and emergence of Randall Cobb should fill the hole.

2.) Drew Brees – He slides behind Rodgers (29), not because he is less elite, but due to age (34) and the fact that he throws more INTs (19 last season) than Rodgers (8 INTs). Coming off of back to back 5,000 pass yard seasons, he became the first player to do so in NFL history, and could do it again this season. The limiting factor (if such a thing exists with Brees) could be the lack of depth after Marques Colston and Lance Moore at receiver, and not having a prototypical every down running back. Given that he will likely put up another 5,000 yd season to go with 45 TDs, one could argue he should be the top QB off the boards. He wouldn’t be my 1st pick as he’ll also throw around 18-19 INTs, or double Rodgers’.

3.) Peyton Manning – What?!?!?!? Brady isn’t in the top 3? No, folks he isn’t. Brady’s loss is Manning’s gain. Talking of Wes Welker, that is. Yes, Manning has a fused nerve in his neck, and yes, he has been around forever (1998), but that should only solidify his status as a top QB. In dynasty leagues, it’d be a great idea to grab another, younger QB, or the top Broncos backup, but, for the time being Peyton should be fine. With the addition of Welker and Monte Ball (RB from draft), the Broncos should be even better offensively, and Manning could actually surpass his numbers from last season (4,659 yds, 37 TDs). Draft him in the mid 2nd round or early 3rd, and enjoy the stats, but also grab his backup and another starting QB. 2013 projections: 4,850 yds, 43 TDs).

4.) Tom Brady – He falls for 3 reasons. First, he lost his favorite receiver and safety blanket, Wes Welker, to Denver in free agency. Secondly, after WR1 Danny Amendola, nobody knows who will step up at receiver. Lastly, both his starting tight ends (TEs; Rob Gronkowski, Aaron Hernandez) are on the shelf recovering from surgery. Note: Gronkowski could miss part of the upcoming season after undergoing a microdiscectomy on his back. Even with a depleted receiving corps, Brady should still put up top 5 Qb numbers, given his pedigree and coach. However, if Amendola goes down or no one steps up opposite Amendola, he could conceivably drop to fringe top 10 QB material. With the Patriots likely utilizing their running backs (Stevan Ridley, Shane Vereen) more this season, Brady might throw less, but still expect 4,800 yds/36 TDs, while limiting INTs, given the inexperience at receiver. Keep an eye on the receiving core and status of Gronk/Hernandez going forward.

Tier 2 or the solid, but still more upside tier

5.) Robert Griffin III – Had he not tore his right ACL January 6th, he’d be entrenched here or possibly higher in the top 5, but he did tear his ACL, so he’s knocked down a little in the rankings. Reports say he will be ready for week 1, and if that’s the case, he could be the steal of the draft at QB. Arguably the top dual threat QB, Griffin could easily put up a combined 35 TDs between passing and rushing this season, but also grab Kirk Cousins if you draft RGIII. Extrapolating his numbers over 16 games last season, Griffin would have gone 3,414 pass yds, 22 pass TDs, and 879 rush yds to go with 8 rush TDs. And that would have likely been his baseline. Assuming a full season of health, and that Fred Davis is healthy (look at Davis’ numbers when healthy), I’ll go 4,000/29 passing, and 600/7 rushing for him, given some of the designed runs are going to be out. Keep an eye on his recovery from knee surgery going into the season. One of the best QB options in true dynasty formats, and no worse than an early 4th round selection in any draft (outside those pansy 4-8 team leagues).

6.) Matt Ryan – He and Griffin are close, and I’m trying to avoid Atlanta favoritism by putting Griffin before Ryan. Since 2009, all Ryan’s stats have gone up. From 2011 to 2012 alone, his yards numbers and touchdowns went up from 4,177/29 to 4,719/32. Could he make the next step into the tier 1 territory? Well if his trends continue, then he should. Also, he is in the prime of his career, got a better receiving back in Steven Jackson, and got Tony Gonzo back. Here’s an aggressive projection: 4,900/41. Does he have a 5,000 pass yard season in him? Only time will tell, but all signs point to yes. Draft him with confidence once the bona fide top 5 QBs are off the boards, and realize he could put up borderline top 5 QB numbers and not come with the downside of advanced age.

7.) Cam Newton – He looked like Mr. Hyde last season, after his monstrous rookie campaign. So which Newton should we get accustomed to seeing? Fortunately, it looks like a good bet to be more like the 2011 season. His season wasn’t all that bad last season from week 9 on, as he averaged (using ESPN averages) 7.7 fantasy points/week from rushing alone. He is the Panthers QB, RB, and big play maker. He may never rush for another ridiculous 14 TDs, like he did in his rookie campaign, but I’d bet on him putting up at least 700 rushing yards for 8 TDs, to go with another 4,000 passing yards and 24 TDs. He is the second best dual threat QB, and doesn’t come with the injury concerns of RGIII and Vick. Of course, if his receiving corps are completely non-existent, he is going to have to pull a LeBron James every week in order for the Panthers to win. Either way, you are looking at a top 10 QB.

8.) Tony Romo – As much as I do not like him, and would not draft him myself, he is a top 10 QB, and is one of the more consistent QBs out there. The downside to him is that he can go from 4 TDs, 0 INTs one week, to 0 TDs, 5 INTs the next week. He is a huge wildcard at times, but more times than not, he’ll be serviceable. He is not the flashiest QB, and doesn’t have any upside at 33, but there are far worse options than drafting him as your starting QB. As long as he stays healthy, and his receivers stay out of trouble (that’s you Dez Bryant), Romo should have no problem posting another 4,550 yd/32 TD season. If Bryant does anything stupid again, knock Romo’s numbers back a little to 4,400/30. Look at it this way, as much as people love hating on Romo, what would the Cowboys be without him?

9.) Russell Wilson – The acquisition of Percy Harvin boosts Wilson’s stock. Now Wilson has a bona fide WR1, as well as depth at WR (Sidney Rice, Golden Tate, Doug Baldwin) to go with the most violent runner in the NFL in Marshawn Lynch. Add that to Wilson’s legs, and Wilson has the potential to solidify his case as a top 10 QB. The difference between him and the 2 dual threat QBs above him is size. Wilson is 5’11, whereas both Griffin and Newton are 6’2″ or above. Then again, did size keep Steve Smith from being an elite receiver for a good numbers of years? No. So, draft Wilson with confidence, and realize he could come cheap for where you get him versus the numbers he could put up. I see more designed runs for him, so I’ll go out on a limb and say he’ll go 3,500/28 passing-wise, and 600/6 rushing-wise.

10.) Matthew Stafford – He and the next QB could be swapped around, but I’ll keep Stafford here for the time being. He could have very easily passed for 26 TDs, had Calvin Johnson not been tackled on the 1 yard line 6 times last season. Despite only throwing for 20 TDs last season, he still put up a whopping 4,967 yds and rushed for 4 TDs. The bad news is he threw 17 INTs and fumbled the ball another 3 times. It is highly doubtful his bad luck carries into this season, and he should return to a more respectable 31 TDs and close to 5,000 pass yds yet again (had 5,037 in 2011), with upside for 33+ TDs. Mid 4th round pick in most formats, maybe a little earlier in dynasty formats.

11.) Andrew Luck – He has the best arm, and is the best decision maker of all the rookie QBs from 2012. In dynasty leagues, he should already be gone by the time you read number 11, as he, like RGIII, could be one of those QBs that transcends the game of football. Take away an ugly number of interceptions (18) and fumbles (9) last season, and you get a very solid QB. He posted 4,374 passing yards and 23 in his rookie season (with another 5 rush TDs). For a glimpse of what could be to come, look at the final drive against the Lions. #Clutch. #Coldblooded. Now do you believe me when I say this guy could transcend the game? Luck will continue to have his ups and downs, and may not throw as much under Pep Hamilton (his offensive coordinator from Stanford, who is West Coast oriented), but will still put up 4,500/30 with upside for more. If you want to bet against me on that, bring it on, I’ll gladly take your money. Fantasy starter, and should not last long on draft boards in any dynasty league.

Tier 3 Mixed bag of upside, consistency, bounce backs.

12.) Colin Kaepernick – Maybe I have him low, but given the names above him on this list, he has to earn his spot. After taking over for Alex Smith in week 10, he did put up good numbers, but you also see 3 sub-200 yard passing games, as well as only top 250 yards passing once (week 17 against AZ). If you look at what he would have done over a 16 game season, you would get he would have thrown for 3,450 yards, 20 TDs, and run for 6 TDs. Not bad, but not that great either. While he has upside, and proved he is a pretty good running QB as well, he is no RGIII, Newton, or Wilson, and likely never will be. He is one of the highest risk/reward QBs in the draft this season. I project 3,200 yds, 23 TDs, passing, with 640 yds/8 TDs rushing for him this season. Of course, being in an elite offense always helps pad numbers, but I would rather have Atlanta’s or Green Bay’s receiving core going forward, especially considering Crabtree (torn ACL) is likely out at least half the season, if not more. One interesting fact: Last season when Kaepernick was at the helm, Delanie Walker (now in TENN) was the better fantasy TE than Vernon Davis (255/2 vs 144/1). I like Kaepernick’s upside, but I’d like him as a solid fantasy back up, or my QB if I go with a running heavy team.

13.) Andy Dalton – Here is my sleeper pick to put up 4,000 yards and 30+ TDs this season. Yes, I’m being serious. Look at who he has at receiver, and look at who the Bengals added in the draft, and you’ll see why. Start with top 5 WR A.J. Green, combine that with the top TE in this season’s draft class, Tyler Eifert, one of the top RBs from the draft class, and RB heir apparent, Giovani Bernard, and you’ll see why I project these numbers for Dalton. If one or more of Andrew Hawkins, Mohamed Sanu, and Jermaine Gresham can elevate their play to take double teams away from Green, Dalton could put up solid numbers. If not, you might want to use him as a pick-and-choose starter. To be safe, target him starting in the 6th round, and possibly as your high-end backup, but be prepared to name him your fantasy starter if one someone steps up for Dalton this season.

14.) Ben Roethlisberger- This is where the drop-off starts, and you start getting into backup QBs. The best thing about Big Ben is his ability to extend plays by staying erect when defenders bear down on him, and refusing to come out of games. The dude looks like someone playing backyard ball where he’s the toughest dude on the field. Ben is a young 31, but is almost a lock to miss time at some point during the season, as he has only one 16 game season (2008) to his name since entering the league in 2004. However, in the games he has played in, he produced. Losing Mike Wallace hurts, but he still has Emmanuel Sanders and Antonio Brown as his top 2 WRs, plus newly drafted Le’Veon Bell, a physical back built similarly to Brandon Jacobs, to give him pretty decent receiving options. Not to mention, the Steelers also nabbed Markus Wheaton to start in 3 back sets, who could also contribute some on special teams. I really don’t care for ESPN’s projections on him, as I see him as a lower end fantasy starter (versus backup according to ESPN), he will still post around 4,000 yds/29 TDs passing, and throw in another 2 rushing TDs (more like falling into the end zone) if he stays healthy for 16 games. You know what they say, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Big Ben could be a nice surprise for fantasy owners this season.

15.) Matt Schaub – Quick, name the season where he posted 4,770 passing yds and 29 TDs. If you said, 2009, you’d be correct. Unfortunately, since then, Schaub’s numbers have been declining, in large part due to injuries to himself or his top wide out Andre Johnson, or Arian Foster taking over the team. However, he has still averaged around 4,000 yds and 23 TDs the past few seasons, even given the injuries to the Texans offense. His decline is probably a combination of the 3, combined with the fact that he never has had a bona fide WR2 to throw to opposite of Johnson. Owen Daniels has done an admirable job filling in as Schaub’s 2nd best receiver, but he is not the long-term answer. Enter in DeAndre Hopkins from the 2013 draft, and Houston may have finally found a true WR2. Hopkins draws Roddy White comparisons, but he likely won’t reach that plateau for a few seasons, unless Johnson goes down again or Hopkins explodes right out of the gate. I would draft Schaub as my backup QB, and would use him as trade bait to upgrade another position, as someone else will likely be looking for a QB. Expect Schaub’s passing yards to remain at or around 4,000 yds, but his TD total to go up to 27 or a little more, depending on the health of the Texans offense, and emergence of Hopkins.

16.) Eli Manning – He is probably the most enigmatic QB in the history of football and fantasy football. Boom-bust, and back to boom at the drop of a hat, Manning has always been middle of the road. Even given Hakeem Nicks and Victor Cruz to help him along, he just can’t seem to crack the top 15 QBs. For an example of his erratic nature, look at weeks 2 and 17, and then compare to weeks 8, 9, 10, and 15. My point is you cannot trust him as your starter, but could do worse for a backup. Kudos to you if you start him when he’s on, but I told ya so, for starting him when he does implode. Use him as a match ups play only, and use him in conjunction with another QB and you should be fine, making special notes to sit him against all good to great teams and defenses. If his receivers Cruz and Nicks are healthy, and the G-Men establish the run game early this season, I’ll give him a shot at 4,150 yds/28 TDs, but he could also put up a 3,500 yd/23 TD campaign.

17.) Josh Freeman – Josh Freeman is a big QB who can run, with an even bigger, and extremely inconsistent arm, as evidenced by 4,065 yds, but also 17 INTs. He is essentially another Ben Roethlisberger, but more athletic, better runner, but more erratic and unpredictable arm. Not all is bad though, as he does have Vincent Jackson (69 catches 1,334 yds, 8 TDs) and Mike Williams (young, inconsistent, 9 TDs last season) at receiver. One has to wonder if the Bucs will commit more to the run, then deep ball approach this season, given that Jackson was signed to be the Bucs deep threat and leading receiver, and the emergence of Doug Martin (1,454 rushing yds/11 TDs) at running back. Josh Freeman is in control of his own destiny, and given the current offense, I’d bet Freeman has some weeks where he single-handedly wins you a match-up, but the next week completely implodes for 3 INTs and a fumble. If he can fix some of his accuracy issues, have Doug Martin continue to bash through defenders, and get some more consistent help from Mike Williams, I could potentially see another 4,000 passing yd season to go with 25 TDs, and 2 rushing TDs. Draft-able back up with the upside to be a fantasy starter. Tread softly when starting him.

18.) Sam Bradford – His numbers are not as bad as they might suggest, given that his offensive line has been awful and he’s never had a reliable receiver, outside of Danny Amendola, who was oft-injured and only played a combined 12 games his last 2 seasons in St Louis. Unfortunately, for Bradford and the Rams, Amendola went to New England. This leaves Chris Givens and Brian Quick as the most experienced receivers on the Rams, who combined for a meager 5 TDs last season. The good news is the Rams signed a very physical, and pass-catching tight end, Jared Cook, and drafted Tavon Austin, arguably the best receiver from the 2013 draft class who should immediately step in and produce. Could these new installments into the offense help turn his career around? I think so, but it may take more than 1 season. Draft him in the latter rounds of the draft in almost all leagues, and in 2 QB leagues or QB, OP leagues, you could do worse than to use him as your 2nd starter. If things break correctly for Bradford, a 3,800 pass yd/27 TD season could be in store, but put his baseline at 3,500/21.

19. Joe Flacco – Before guys start bitching at me for having him this low, let me explain. First off, outside of Torrey Smith, who does Flacco have at receiver? Tandon Doss and Aaron Mellette are the top options. Secondly, he has never gotten close to top 10 QB territory, as he has never come close to posting 4,000 yds passing, nor eclipsed 25 pass TDs in a season. Add into the mix the fact that he lost Anquan Boldin to the 49ers, and you see why I have him this low. Yes, one could argue that he has Ray Rice to throw to out of the backfield, but RR can’t do everything folks. Without Rice, Flacco would be even lower than this ranking. I’ll admit, Ray is one of the best, if not the best pass catching running backs in the game today, but unless someone outside of Smith steps up, teams will simply stack the box or double Smith, further hurting Flacco’s already mediocre numbers. I’m not saying don’t draft Flacco, as he could be one of the better back up QBs, I’m just skeptical that he’ll ever be capable of being a fantasy starter. Weirder things have happened, however. For this season, temper expectations coming off of Flacco’s Super Bowl MVP performance, but still expect 3,700 yds passing/21 TDs, with another 3 rushing TDs, depending on if anyone steps up outside of Smith at receiver. His best case scenario might be to utilize both TEs Ed Dickson and Dennis Pitta this season.

Tier 4 There are very few, if any, QBs I would trust as my starter, and would only use these guys as bye week or short-term injury fill ins.

20.) Michael Vick – A Chip Kelly offense, plus glass bones, doesn’t inspire much confidence. Add to that an erratic arm and bad fumbling problems, and the result could be disastrous. Michael Vick is going to miss games this season and turn the ball over a ton of times. The only question is how many total TDs will he put up in a likely 12 game season (seems about right)? Looking at the receivers Jeremy Maclin, DeSean Jackson, and upgrade at TE he got from the draft in Zach Ertz, his pass catchers are above average. The problem is Vick himself. He tries to make too many running passes, and runs the ball too much, leading him to fumble the ball a ton, and also get knocked out even more often. Maybe Chip Kelly will be the piece to finally keep Vick healthy for 16 games, but it’s also as likely he’ll be the reason Vick’s glass bones shatter once and for all. If Vick somehow does miraculously play 16 games, I’d put him at 3,200/20 passing and 700/5 rushing, but I’d suspect he’ll play 11 games for 2,400 yds/12 TDs passing and 400/3 rushing. At any rate, I wouldn’t draft him to be on my fantasy teams as anything more than an OP or 2nd QB in 2 QB leagues. He is the best QB the Eagles have, so that counts for something.

21.) Philip Rivers – Remember that time when Rivers was an elite QB, and the Chargers were talking of the Super Bowl? Well those days are long gone, and Rivers would only benefit from a new head coach, new offensive line, and a new right shoulder. The Chargers offense is mediocre at best, with Danario Alexander as their top receiver, and oft-injured Ryan Mathews as their starting tailback. Now for the good news: They drafted an extremely raw receiver in Keenan Allen, and still have Antonio Gates, though he is getting up there in age (32). I’m not inspired to draft him, and wouldn’t be shocked if Rivers continues his sharp decline that arguably started in 2011, and he may not even be starter come season’s end. If you get 4,000 yds/27 TDs out of him this season, count your blessings. If I had him, I’d trade him for an upside QB or RB while I still could, though. As much as I liked him as a fantasy starter from 2008-2010, I no longer want him on my fantasy teams, outside of a back up.

22.) Jay Cutler – I honestly never hopped on the Cutler bandwagon when he went to Chicago, as I knew he wasn’t going to do much. When you nearly have more INTs and fumbles last season (21) than you have played games the past 2 seasons (25 total), you know no one wants you on a fantasy squad. Even the re-emergence of Brandon marshall last season in Chicago couldn’t help Cutler post more TDs (19) than fumbles + INTs (21). As good as I expect Brandon Marshall to be this season, I expect Jay Cutler to be that bad. This is because, Cutler needs to cut down on the turnovers and stop forcing balls downfield. He has decent options behind Marshall, Alshon Jeffery, RB Matt Forte when healthy, and newly acquired Martellus Bennett, who oozes with potential, but they can’t help him when he’s throwing more and more INTs. Of course, the Bears offensive line could also pitch in by not allowing him to get sacked basically 4 times/game, but you can’t blame the line for most of the INTs. 3,100 pass yds/22 TDs is his ceiling this season, unless he miraculously fixes the INT issues and the O-line provides at least decent protection. Note: Newly drafted left guard Kyle Long should help protect Cutler’s blind side. 

Tier 5 QBs who have upside (some tremendous), but would not touch, at least for the time being, outside of 20 team leagues. Keep an eye on these names though.

23.) Christian Ponder – I liked him some coming out of FSU, and actually believe me might be the long term answer in Minnesota. He has the pieces around him to be a top 15 QB, but needs to be more consistent. Any team that has AP, Greg Jennings, explosive down field threat rookie Cordarrelle Patterson, and a mobile QB should take down-field shots. The problem is, the coaching staff is hesitant to do so. If the Vikings take the training wheels off Ponder’s down-field potential, which would require Ponder to be better than a  scatter shot passer down field (part of the reason for the training wheels), we could see Ponder post 3,300 yds passing (would be his 1st 3,000 yd season) and 23 TDs. The bad news here is he’ll also like post 15 INTs. The pieces are there, now it’s just a matter of Ponder showing his potential this season, like he did in week 17 (234/3 TD/ 0 INT, last season. Draft him late in dynasty leagues, and keeper leagues.

24.) Alex Smith – This is an interesting situation. Smith has a good arm, but not that mobile. San Francisco traded Smith to KC and Andy Reid (him again?) on the cheap this off-season, and now, the Chiefs actually have a competent QB, as the Cassel experiment is over. He threw for 30 TDs/10 INTs over his last 2 seasons in SF, but his immobility ultimately cost him his gig. The bad news with Smith is he needs San Francisco-esque defense and offensive line, neither of which K.C. has, to stay on the field. Those 2 reasons are why Smith was successful in SF. In K.C., outside of Dwayne Bowe and Jamaal Charles, the offense is extremely stagnant and under-developed. The next best receiving option after Bowe is Dexter McCluster, who is quick, but hasn’t done much in the NFL. Given the state of the team, and the Chiefs rebuilding, the best case scenario for Smith would be 3,000 pass yds/18 TDs. The only thing you can say for K.C is they know what they are doing in rebuilding. Best to grab him off the waiver wire (WW) when you need a bye week filler or short-term injury replacement, but only use against below average and below defenses.

25.) Carson Palmer – He is the one QB in this tier who has virtually no upside, apart from getting to throw to Larry Fitzgerald. Palmer is a shell of his old self, and it’s safe to say we’ll never see him approach his numbers from 2005-2007, especially after a horrendous elbow injury in 2008 that cost him 12 games of the 2008 season. The offensive line, and offense, in general is in disarray. Who is their starting RB, and will he be healthy? I’d bet on Rashard Mendenhall, but he looked slow after returning in 2012 from an ACL tear, leaving one to suspect this very likely could be another RBBC with Mendenhall, Ryan Williams, Andre Ellington (2013 draftee), and Stepfan Taylor (2013 draftee). Of those RBs, I’d draft both Andre Ellington and Stepfan Taylor, and keep an eye on the health of both Mendenhall and Williams. My point is, unless the running backs stay healthy and move the chains, and Michael Floyd taps into his potential, Palmer could be in for another dismal season. Too many things have to break right for Palmer to do much more than throw for 4,000 yards/20 touchdowns. Beware, picks galore are bound to happen in Arizona. Stay away at all costs.

Names to keep an eye on/sleepers:

Ryan Tannehill – Gains Mike Wallace on offense, and has a good arm, but can he be consistent enough to warrant a draft pick or WW pickup? He’ll need to improve upon his 12 TD/13 INT rookie campaign to be more than a blip on the radar. Interesting dynasty QB to keep an eye on, especially with what Miami has done this off-season.

Jake Locker – Has all the necessary tools to be an NFL QB (including 4.59 40 yard speed), and has some interesting receivers in Kenny Britt (possible suspension coming), Kendall Wright, and rookie Justin Hunter, but throws too many picks and is extremely wild-throwing. If he ever overcomes his inaccuracy and interception issues, he could be draftable outside of dynasty leagues, but he needs to show some nice stats before he should be considered.

Geno Smith – Was the best QB in the 2013 draft class, but lands in the most horrible spot imaginable. The Jets are a total wreck, with Chris Ivory (RB) their best play maker, and a reluctance to realize that Sanchez’s career as starter should have been over after the butt fumble, and should be cut at all costs. The only way Geno Smith would have value this season, and I do like Smith, would be if Rex Ryan and Mark Sanchez left New York, and the Jets quit moving backwards. They need everything. Get the kid a receiver or 2, and a better offensive line to complement Ivory’s upside and I’ll bite. Until that happens (hopefully sooner than later), just draft Geno Smith and keep him on your bench. This season, I see Geno starting 10-11 games, and outproducing Sanchez, but he has more value as a dynasty prospect than starter this season.

E.J Manuel – If you are looking for a deep, deep sleeper, and a dynasty name to stash away, Manuel is your man. The Bills are rebuilding, but have Stevie Johnson, and a plethora of young receivers (Robert Woods- 2013 draftee, T.J. Graham Marquise Goodwin, Da’Rick Rodgers- 2013 draftee), and C.J. Spiller (RB) all ready to step in and hopefully help Manuel’s transition to the NFL go smoothly once he is handed the reigns. I think he has an outside shot at starting 2013 as the Bills QB as Kolb shouldn’t be that hard to beat out for the gig. In a full season, expect ups and downs, but given his pedigree as a hybrid QB, he could be in for a 2,300/15 passing, and 300/3 rushing line in his rookie campaign.

Well, that’s a wrap on the top 25 QBs plus 3 sleepers for this season. Good luck in fantasy football this season. If I play in a league with you, you can be assured I am going to beat you into the ground, and I look forward to matching up with you.

Don’t forget to follow me on twitter @MetalhammerBen (yeah I should tweet more, lol), and tune in for my next installment: TE rankings.

I am a recent college graduate from a small liberal arts school in Atlanta, GA. I'm a sports junkie and a diehard Atlanta sports fan.

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